The KISS Printable Books Page
(Code and Color Key)

Finite Verb or Verbal?
Based on "Handel, the Great Musician,"
from - Golden Deeds: Stories from History Retold for Little Folk
Analysis Key

1. Seeing this his father was very distressed (P) and alarmed (P). |

"His father seeing this" does not pass the sentence test, so "seeing" is not a finite verb. [It is a gerundive modifying "father," and "this" is its direct object. Many people would prefer to see a comma after "this," but there was none in the original.]
2. {At that time} organists and musicians were very poorly paid (P), | and 

George Handel wanted his boy to get on well {in the world}. |

"Boy to get on well" does not pass either the "to" or the sentence test, and thus "to get" is not a finite verb. [It is an infinitive, and "boy" is its subject. The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "wanted." Note that "get on" is a phrasal verb that means "to succeed."]
3. But {in spite} {of so much care and trouble taken }, it was impossible (PA)

to destroy the strongest desire {of the boy’s nature}. |

"So much care and trouble taken" does not pass the sentence test, so "taken" is not a finite verb. [It is a gerundive that modifies "care" and "trouble."]
     "Anyone to destroy the desire" does not pass either the "to" or the sentence test, so "to destroy" is not a finite verb. [It is an infinitive, and "desire" is its direct object. The infinitive phrase functions as a delayed subject -- to destroy the strongest desire of the boy's nature was impossible." 
4. He arose {in great surprise}, | and calling his wife they went to find out the 

cause {of these strange sounds}. |

"They calling his wife" does not pass the sentence test, so "calling" is not a finite verb. [It is a gerundive that technically modifies "they" in its own main clause, but actually refers to the "He" in the first clause.] 
"Wife" is the direct object of "calling."
     "They to find out" does not pass the sentence test, so "to find out" ("discover") is not a finite verb. [It is an infinitive that functions as an adverb of purpose to "went."] "Cause" is the direct object of "to find out."
5. Then, opening the door and holding up the candle [Adj. to "candle" he carried],

George Handel peered wonderingly {into the dusty old lumber-room}. |

"George Handel opening the door and holding up the candle" does not pass the sentence test, so "opening" and "holding" are not finite verbs. [They are gerundives that modify "George Handel."] "Door" is the direct object of "opening," and "candle" is the direct object of "holding."