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(Code and Color Key)

Finite Verb or Verbal? The "To" Test (Ex # 6)
from Stories of Robin Hood Told to the Children, by Henrietta Elizabeth Marshall
Analysis Key

 
1. And the bishops allowed him to do so [#1]. |

2. She let them shout and bang [#2] {at her door} as much [Adv. to preceding "as" as they liked]. |

3. I will teach you how to use bow and arrows. [#3] |

4. [Adv. to "turned" When Richard had made Robin rise and stand [#4] {by his 

side}], he turned {to the men}. |

5. He hoped either to kill Robin or to take him prisoner, and bring him [#5] {to 

Nottingham} to have him hanged [#6] there. |


Notes
1. "So" here functions as a pronoun, the direct object of the infinitive "to do"; "him" is the subject of the infinitive, and the infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "allowed."
2. "Them" is the subject of the infinitives "shout" and "bang"; the infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "let."
3. "Bow" and "arrows" are direct objects of the infinitive "to use." The function of the infinitive can be explained in two ways, depending on how one explains "how." "How" can be considered a pronoun, the direct object of " will teach." In this explanation, "you" is the indirect object of "will teach" and the infinitive phrase based on "to use" functions as an adjective to "how." Alternatively, "how" can be considered an adverb to the infinitive "to use." In this view, "you" is the subject of the infinitive and the infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "will teach."
4. "Robin" is the subject of the infinitives "rise" and "stand." The infinitive phrase is the direct object of "had made."
5. "Robin" is the direct object of the infinitive "to kill"; "prisoner" is a predicate noun after an ellipsed infinitive ("to be"), the subject of which is "him" -- "him *to be* prisoner." This infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of the infinitive "to take." The second "him" is the direct object of the infinitive "to bring." The three infinitives ("to kill," to take" and "bring") are direct objects of "hoped."
6. "Him hanged" can be explained in at least two ways. The first, and probably the best, is to consider "him" as the subject, and "hanged" (a gerundive) as the predicate adjective, of an ellipsed infinitive -- "him *to be* hanged." This infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "to have." At KISS Level Five, some students might prefer a different explanation and view "him hanged" as a noun absolute that functions as the direct object of "to have." The infinitive "to have" functions as an adverb (of purpose) to "bring."