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Distinguishing Finite Verbs from Verbals -- Ex # 2
[from "Thumbelina," in Andrew Lang's The Yellow Fairy Book]
Analysis Key through KISS Level Three (Clauses) +

Remember that the primary objective here is that students should not underline the verbals twice. The students should not be expected to remember the names or functions of the verbals, but for those who may be interested, I have placed those explanations in brackets.

1. There was the swallow (PN) flying past! |

"The swallow flying past" is not an acceptable sentence. ["Flying" is a gerundive that modifies "swallow." For "There," see also "Expletives."] 
2. On she sailed {past several towns}, | and the little birds sitting {in the bushes} saw

her (DO), and sang. |

"The little birds sitting in the bushes" is not an acceptable sentence. ["Sitting" is a gerundive that modifies "birds."]
3. But the corn had been gone a long time [NuA]; | only the dry, bare stubble

was left (P) standing {in the frozen ground}. |

At KISS Level Two, if a student underlined "was left standing" as the finite verb phrase, I would simply accept it. If, however, "was left" is underlined as the finite verb phrase, then "the stubble standing" does not make an acceptable sentence. [Within KISS, two explanations are easily acceptable: 1) "Standing" is a gerundive that modifies stubble. 2) "stubble was left standing" is a palimpsest pattern in which "the stubble was standing" is written over "the stubble was left."]
4. So he took his golden crown (DO) {from off his head} and put it (DO) {on hers},

asking her her name, and [DO of "asking" if she would be his wife (PN)], | and

then she would be Queen (PN) {of all the flowers}. |

"He asking her her name" is not an acceptable sentence. ["Her" is the indirect object, and "name" is the direct object of "asking." "Asking" is a gerundive that modifies "he."]
     Note the technical problem in the final clause. I have marked it as a separate main clause because of the "and," but in meaning, the clause conveys the result of her saying "Yes" to his request -- "If she would be his wife, then she would be Queen of all the flowers." It could have been written as "asking ... if she would be his wife so that then she would be Queen of all the flowers." But this would mean that her purpose in becoming his wife would be that she would become Queen. Obviously, that was not the Little Prince's primary idea. Thus the sentence, so to speak, snaps, and the idea of her becoming Queen is broken off as a separate idea.