The KISS Grammar Workbooks Back to April Menu
(Code and Color Key)

Distinguishing Finite Verbs from Verbals -- Ex # 1
[from "Thumbelina," in Andrew Lang's The Yellow Fairy Book]
Analysis Key through KISS Level Three (Clauses) +

Note: Remember that the important point in this exercise is simply that students should not underline the "to" phrases as finite verbs. For students and teachers who want to know, I have added explanations of these phrases, but that definitely does not mean that students should be expected to learn these explanations now. Verbals, after all, are the entire focus of KISS Level Four.

1. She did not know where to get one from. |

There are at least two acceptable explanations here. In either of them, "one" is the direct object of "to get." "Where" can be explained as a pronoun that functions as the direct object of "did know." In this perspective, the infinitive "to get" functions as an adjective to "where." Alternatively, "where" can be explained as an adverb to the infinitive "to get" and the infinitive then functions as the direct object of "did know." Note that the "from" is superfluous and would probably not be considered as acceptable in formal writing. It is, so to speak, probably added as an additional syntactic connection, and thus it suggests still another explanation -- "from where to get one."  In this explanation, "where" is the object of the preposition "from," and the prepositional phrase acts as an adverb to the infinitive which functions as the direct object of "did know."
2. It must be very miserable (PA) to be a little bird! |
"Bird" is a predicate noun after the infinitive "to be." The infinitive phrase functions as a delayed subject -- "To be a little bird must be very miserable."
3. But it won't do {for you} to live {with me}; | I am not tidy (PA) enough to

please you. |

The infinitive "to live" functions as a delayed subject -- "To live with me won't do for you." An alternate explanation would be to consider the "you" as the subject of the infinitive. This would make the infinitive phrase "you to live with me" the object of the preposition "for." The prepositional phrase can then be considered to be the delayed subject -- "For you to live with me won't do."
     "You" is the direct object of the infinitive "to please." This infinitive phrase functions as an adverb to "enough" which functions as an adverb to "tidy."
4. She wanted to fetch the pretty cradle to put it {into her room} [Adv. to "to put" 

before Thumbelina herself came there]. |

If your students are not yet distinguishing finite verbs from verbals, the "to fetch" can simply be considered part of the finite verb "wanted to fetch" Otherwise it is an infinitive that functions as the direct object of "wanted." In either explanation, "cradle" is the direct object of "to fetch."
     "It" is the direct object of the infinitive "to put," which functions as an adverb to "wanted." "Herself" is an appositive to "Thumbelina."