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Indirect Objects as Subjects of Verbals (Infinitives)
Based on Child-Story Readers: Wonder Stories 3,
Analysis Key

1. {Among other things} they advised her (IO) [#1] to build a house [#1] {beside the roadside}. |

2. The king told the big man (IO) to go and kill that buffalo [#2]. |

3. The stork begged Thumbietot (IO) to forgive him [#3]. |

4. The White Cat told him (IO) not to be afraid [#4]. |

5. He did not ask the White Cat (IO) to explain this [#5]. |

6. She told the twins (IO) to climb [#6] {to the first branches} {of a tall fir tree}. |

7. The White Cat soon came and asked the Prince (IO) to join their sport [#7]. |

8. I begged the fairies (IO) to bring me some cord and needles [#8]. |

9. Jack and Jane like to help Uncle Jim do many things [#9] {on the farm}. |

10. Omar taught the elephant (IO) to stand [#10] {on his hind feet}, to kneel [#10], to

march [#10], to raise [#10] his trunk and salute [#10] {like a soldier}, and to sit [#10] down {at the table}. |


Notes
1. "Advised" raises an interesting question that is not discussed in grammar textbooks. No regular noun would function as the direct object after "advised her." Thus some grammarians will consider "her" to be the subject of the verbal (infinitive) "to build," and the entire verbal phrase to be the direct object of "advised." "House" is the direct object of the verbal "to build." (Most grammar textbooks pay little, if any, attention to the complements of verbals.)
2. "Buffalo" is the direct object of the verbal (infinitives) "to kill." The verbals "to go" and "kill" are the direct objects of "told."
3. In analyzing real texts, indirect objects slide into direct objects. Is "him" the indirect or the direct object of "forgive"? Considering something such as "to forgive him his sins," I would say that "him" in this case could be considered the indirect object of "forgive," but when no direct object is given, I would accept "him" as the direct object. The verbal (infinitive) phrase functions as the direct object of "begged."
4. "Afraid" is a predicate adjective after the verbal (infinitive) "to be." The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "told."
5. "This" is the direct object of the verbal (infinitive) "to explain." The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "did ask."
6. The verbal (infinitive) "to climb" functions as the direct object of "told."
7. "Sport" is the direct object of the infinitive "to join." The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "asked."
8. "Cord" and "needles" are direct objects of the infinitive "to bring"; "me" is an indirect object of "to bring," and the verbal phrase based on the infinitive functions as the direct object of "begged."
9. "Things" is the direct object of the verbal (infinitive) "do." "Uncle Jim" is the indirect object of the infinitive "to help" (and the subject of "do").  The "to help" phrase is the direct object of "like."
10. These infinitives (verbals)  all function as direct objects of "taught." Their subject is "elephant." "Trunk" is the direct object of "to raise."