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Using the "To" Test to Eliminate Verbals
From Pinocchio, The Tale of a Puppet, by C. Collodi
Analysis Key

1. {In his hurry} to model Pinocchio [#1] , Geppetto had forgotten to make

any ears [#2] . |

2. Poor Geppetto rushed {after Pinocchio} but was not able (PA) to overtake him [#3] . |

3. Here I am, ready [#4] to serve you [#5] . |

4. Master Antonio [DirA] , I came to ask a favor [#6] {of you}. |

5. I would travel {about the world} to earn a piece {of bread} and a glass [#7] {of wine}. |

6. He is right (PA) not to wish to return [#8] home [NuA] ! |

7. Geppetto took his tools (DO) and set to work to cut out and model his puppet [#9] . |

8. He then took the puppet (DO) {under the arms} and placed him (DO) {on the

floor} to teach him to walk [#10] . |

9. It was impossible (PA) to say [#11] [DO where it came {from} [#12] ]. |

10. To tell you [#13] {in confidence}, I have no wish (DO) to learn [#14] . |


Notes
1. "Pinocchio" is the direct object of the verbal (infinitive) "to model." The infinitive phrase functions as an adjective to "hurry."
2. "Ears" is the direct object of the verbal (infinitive) "to make." The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "had forgotten."
3. "Him" is the direct object of the verbal (infinitive) "to overtake." The infinitive phrase functions as an adverb to "able."
4. "Ready" could be explained as a predicate adjective, but the comma that separates it from "am" argues against this interpretation. It functions more as a post-positioned adjective. See KISS Level 5.5 - Post-Positioned Adjectives.
5. "You" is the direct object of the verbal (infinitive) "to serve." The infinitive phrase functions as an adverb to "ready."
6.  "Favor" is the direct object of the verbal (infinitive) "to ask." The infinitive phrase functions as an adverb of purpose to "came."
7.  "Piece" and "glass" are direct objects of the verbal (infinitive) "to earn." The infinitive phrase functions as an adverb of purpose to "would travel."
8. "To return" is a verbal (infinitive) that functions as the direct object of "to wish." "To wish" is a verbal (infinitive) that is modified by "not" and functions as an adverb to "right."
9. "Puppet" is the direct object of the verbals (infinitives) "to cut" and "model." If one considers "work" to be a noun here, then the infinitive phrases function as adjectives; if one considers "work" to be a verb, then the infinitives function as adverbs. "To work" can be explained either as a prepositional phrase that functions as an adverb to "set," or as a verbal (infinitive) that functions either as an adverb or as the direct object of "set," depending on the question that one sees it as answering in relation to "set."
10. "Him" is the subject of the verbal (infinitive) "to walk." That infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of the infinitive "to teach." The "to teach" phrase functions as an adverb (of purpose) to "placed."
11. The phrase headed by the verbal (infinitive) "to say" functions as a delayed subject {"to say ... is impossible"). See KISS Level 5.6 - Delayed Subjects and Sentences.
12. "Where" functions simultaneously as the subordinating conjunction and the object of the preposition "from" -- "It came from where?"
13. "You" is the indirect object of the verbal (infinitive) "To tell." The infinitive phrase functions as an adverb to "have." (Note that the whole phrase means "confidentially. Note also that there is a good case for considering either of these as interjections. They do not modify the "have" as much as they indicate the speaker's attitude toward the words in the "have" pattern.)
14. "To learn" is a verbal (infinitive) that functions as an adjective to "wish."